Curriculum Details for S and SC Forms

SUBJECTS

  • Accounts, Commerce and Economics
    i. Accounts (ISC)
    ii. Commerce (ISC)
    iii. Economics (ISC)
    iv. Business and Management (IB)
    v. Economics (IB)
  • Art
  • Computer Science (ISC)
  • Computer Science (IB)
  • Careers Information, Education and Guidance
  • English (ISC)
  • English (IB)
  • Modern Foreign Languages
    i. French
    ii. German
  • Hindi
  • Humanities
    i. Geography
    ii. History (ISC)
    iii. Political Science (ISC)
    iv. Psychology (ISC)
    v. Geography (IB)
    vi. History (IB)
  • Mathematics
    i. Mathematics (ISC)
    ii. Mathematics (IB)
  • Music
    i. Hindustani Music – Vocal/Instrumental (ISC)
    ii. Tabla (ISC)
    iii. Western Music (ISC)
    iv. Music (IB)
  • Physical Education
    i. Physical Education – Compulsory
    ii. Physical Education – 6th Subject
  • Sciences
    i. Biology (ISC)
    ii. Chemistry (ISC)
    iii. Physics (ISC)
    iv. Biology (IB)
    v. Chemistry (IB)
    vi. Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) (IB)

 

Accounts, Commerce and Economics – Accounts (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Accounts, Commerce and Economics (ACE)

Subject:Accounts

Curriculum:ISC

Course Content

S Form

  • Basic accounting concepts
  • Journal, ledger and trial balance
  • Bank reconciliation statement
  • Depreciation, provisions and reserves
  • Bills of exchange
  • Final accounts
  • Accounting from incomplete records
  • Non-trading organization
  • Rectification of errors
  • Introduction to the use of computers in accounting

SC Form

Section A

  • Joint venture
  • Partnership
  • Joint stock company accounts

Section B

  • Financial statement analysis
  • Cash flow statement (only for non financial companies)
  • Ratio analysis

Section C

  • Accounting application of electronic spread sheet
  • Database management system (DBMS)

Learning Objectives

  • To provide an understanding of the principles of Accounts, and practice in recording transactions and interpreting individual as well as company accounts
  • To develop an understanding of the forms and classification of financial statements as a means of communicating financial information

Skills Acquired By Students

  • Ability to read and interpret financial statement
  • Communication skills
  • Research skills

General Comments

The subject requires constant practice and aims at improving analytical skills along with numerical abilities of pupils. Use of calculators is permitted.

Accounts, Commerce and Economics – Commerce (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Accounts, Commerce and Economics (ACE)

Subject:Commerce

Curriculum::ISC

Course Content

S Form

  • Nature and purpose of business
  • Forms of business organization
  • Stock exchange
  • Emerging modes of business
  • Inland trade
  • Foreign trade
  • Warehousing
  • Insurance

SC Form

  • Corporate organization
  • Social responsibility of business and business ethics
  • Business environment
  • Financing
  • Management
  • Communications
  • Marketing

Learning Objectives

  • To develop an interest in the theory and practice of business, trade and industry
  • To familiarize students with theoretical foundations, organizing, managing and handling operations of a business firm
  • To provide a study of the more important aspects of the commercial world
  • To provide knowledge of the activities of commerce in the marketing of goods and services

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Research skills
  • Communication skills
  • Team work

General Comments

The syllabus is very comprehensive and provides the students with a very good idea about the working of various types of business and commercial organizations.

Accounts, Commerce and Economics – Economics (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Art

Subject:Economics

Curriculum::ISC

Course Content

S Form

  • Understanding Economics
  • Indian Economic Development
  • Statistics

SC Form

  • Micro Economic Theory
  • Theory of Income and Employment
  • Money and Banking
  • National Income
  • Public Finance

Learning Objectives

  • To enable students to acquire knowledge and develop an understanding of facts, terms, concepts conventions, trends, principles, generalizations, assumptions, hypothesis, problems, processes etc in economics
  • To acquaint students with tools of economic analysis
  • To develop an understanding of important economic problems
  • To acquaint students with the main institutions through which the productive process is carried out
  • To enable students to compare their own economic structure with that of the other areas of the world

Skills Required to Learn

  • Research skills
  • Use of economic tools
  • Ability to predict and understand economic trends

General Comments

The syllabus is very comprehensive and provides the students with a very good idea about the working of an economy.

Accounts, Commerce and Economics – Business and Management (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Accounts, Commerce and Economics (ACE)

Subject:Business and Management

Curriculum::IB

Course Content

  • Business Organization and Environment
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing
  • Accounts and Financing
  • Operations Management
  • Business Strategy

Learning Objectives

The Business and Management course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market.

It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to promote their appreciation of cultural diversity through the study of topics like international marketing, human resource management, growth and business strategy.

The ideals of international cooperation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of Diploma Programme of Business and Management.

The course encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns and issues of social responsibility in the global business environment.

Students should be able to make sense of the forces and circumstances that drive and restrain change in an interdependent and multicultural world.

The Business and Management course will contribute to students’ development as critical and effective participants in local and world affairs.

Skills Acquired By Students

Decision making skills

Critical thinking

Reflective and analytical

General Comments

The subject is offered at both Higher Level and Standard Level. The course content is designed in such a manner that it helps to lay down the foundation for students wishing to pursue Business Management courses at higher level. The course is provides an overview of business operations in a globalized context. Students are exposed to a number of case studies during the two year period in which they study the programme.

Accounts, Commerce and Economics – Economics (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Accounts, Commerce and Economics (ACE)

Subject:Economics

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

The syllabus is divided into 4 areas.

  • Microeconomics:

    This area includes topics such as demand and supply; Market equilibrium, the price mechanism, and market efficiency; Elasticities; Indirect taxes, subsidies and price controls; Costs, revenues and profits; Perfect competition; Monopoly; Monopolistic competition; Oligopoly; Price discrimination; Market failure

  • Macroeconomics:

    This area includes topics such as: The level of economic activity; Aggregate demand; Aggregate supply; Macroeconomic equilibrium; Low unemployment; A low and stable rate of inflation; Economic growth; Equity in the distribution of income

  • International Economics:

    This area includes topics such as why do countries trade; free trade and protectionism; Exchange rates; Balance of payments; Economic integration; Terms of trade

  • Development Economics:

    Economic development; measuring development; Domestic factors and economic development; International trade and economic development; foreign direct investment and economic development; aid, debt and economic development; The balance between markets and intervention

There are 3 papers in HL. Paper I is Essay type questions which comes from Micro and Macro economics. Paper II is data response questions which deal with International economics and development economics. Paper III tests students from across the syllabus. SL students have just two papers Essay type and Data response.

Apart from this every student taking Economics will have to write 3 commentaries from three different areas of the syllabus of 750 words each.

A large number of students including SL students opt for Extended Essay in this subject.

Learning Objectives

  • Students imbibe a deep understanding of the functioning of global economies. They develop a wide perspective of issues and are able to critically analyse and evaluate an economic development. They are able to correlate one topic to the other. Real world association is fostered among students from the very beginning.
  • To acquaint students with tools of economic analysis.
  • To develop an understanding of important economic problems.
  • To acquaint students with the main institutions through which the productive process is carried out.
  • To enable students to compare their own economic structure with that of the other areas of the world.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Research skills through a spirit of enquiry.
  • Use of economic tools
  • Ability to predict and understand economic trends
  • Analyze
  • Evaluate
  • Draw correct labeled diagrams
  • Independent thinking and internationalism. They learn to remove biases from their evaluation
  • Referencing skills are developed
  • Writing skills are fundamental to success here
  • Reflective, principled and balanced
  • Open minded, communication and caring attitude
  • Risk taking

General Comments

There is an overlapping emphasis on international economics and development economics. Students become more international minded. Students are often encouraged to draw their knowledge from a wide variety of resources and through different approaches. Answers have a wide range of acceptability and often there are no yes /no answers.

Art

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Art

Subject:Art

Curriculum::ISC and IB

Course Content

S Form

  • Paper 1: Drawing or Painting from Still Life
  • Paper 2: Drawing or Painting from the Nature
  • Crafts ‘B’ (Paper 6)
    • Painting
    • Sculpture
    • Ceramic
    • Digital Art
    • Textile
    • Photography
    • Printmaking
    • Filmmaking

SC Form

  • Paper 1: Drawing or Painting from Still Life
  • Paper 2: Drawing or Painting from the Nature
  • Crafts ‘B’ (Paper 6)
    • Painting
    • Sculpture
    • Ceramic
    • Digital Art
    • Textile
    • Photography
    • Printmaking
    • Filmmaking

Learning Objectives

  • Developing observation and drawing skill
  • Developing Observational skill of natural objects
  • Developing Craft Making Skill
  • Understanding of Material Manipulation

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Observational Skill
  • Colour application and manipulation of surface
  • Manipulation of space and form

General Comments

The candidates must submit at least one and not more than two example of craftwork which they have executed during the school year from any one of the craft from the above mentioned categories. Further evidence of study in the form of working drawings, small notebook, or photographs may also be submitted.

Computer Science (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Computer Science

Subject:Computer Science

Curriculum::ISC

Course Content

S Form

  • Basics of computer hardware and software
  • Introduction to algorithmic problem-solving using Java
  • Elementary data structures and associated algorithms, basic input/output
  • Implementation of algorithms to solve problems
  • Social context of computing and ethical issues

SC Form

  • Revision of programming done in S form
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Computer hardware
  • Arrays, Strings
  • Inheritance, polymorphism, data structures, computational complexity
  • Complexity and big O notation

Learning Objectives

  • To understand algorithmic problem-solving using data abstractions, functional and procedural abstractions, and object-based and object-oriented abstractions
  • To understand:
    • how computers represent, store and process data by studying the architecture and machine language of a simple microprocessor and the different levels of abstraction that mediate between the machine and the algorithmic problem-solving level and
    • how they communicate with the outside world.
  • To create awareness of ethical problems and issues related to computing.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Logical, mathematical and analytical skills
  • Computational and algorithmic thinking
  • Programming and problem-solving skills using a high level language (JAVA)

General Comments

The subject is quite popular among the students who wish to pursue Science and Engineering at a higher level. In the recent past we have seen many students who want to make a career in multimedia, designing, and architecture also opting for this subject. Each lesson is taken in the computer laboratories and students relate what they study in their classes. There are seven classes every week. Although prior knowledge of programming is not essential, the students who had opted for Computer Applications in their B and A forms have an advantage as their fundamentals are already strong. Students new to programming become at par with these students with a little effort and hard work. The ISC results of our students in the subject have been consistently among the best in the country.

Computer Science (IB) – S and SC

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Computer Science

Subject:Computer Science

Curriculum::IB

Course Content

HL/SL

  • Topic 1: System fundamentals (20 hours)
  • Topic 2: Computer organization (6 hours)
  • Topic 3: Networks (9 hours)
  • Topic 4: Computational thinking, problem-solving and programming (45 hours)

Options

Students study one of the following options:

  • Option A: Databases
  • Option B: Modelling and simulation
  • Option C: Web science
  • Option D: Object-oriented programming (OOP)

HL Extension

The topics that must be studied,including some practical work, are:

  • Topic 5: Abstract data structures (23 hours)
  • Topic 6: Resource management (8 hours)
  • Topic 7: Control (14 hours)

Case Study

HL/SL

Internal Assessment Solution

Learning Objectives

  • Provide opportunities for study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students developing the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science
  • Demonstrate initiative in applying thinking skills critically to identify and resolve complex problems
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication in resolving complex problems
  • Develop logical and critical thinking as well as experimental, investigative and problem-solving skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of computer science to communicate information confidently and effectively
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with continued developments in IT systems and computer science
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Logical, mathematical and analytical skills
  • Computational and algorithmic thinking
  • Programming and problem-solving skills using a High Level Language

General Comments

The subject is quite popular among the students who wish to pursue Science and Engineering at a higher level. In the recent past we have seen students who want to make a career in IT opting for this subject with ITGS. Each lesson is taken in the computer laboratories and students relate what they study in their classes. There are six classes every week. Although prior knowledge of programming is not a prerequisite, students who had opted for Computer Applications in their B and A forms have an advantage as their fundamentals are already strong. Students new to programming become at par with these students with a little effort and hard work.

Careers Information, Education and Guidance

Academic Department Details

Department:Careers Information, Education and Guidance Department

Subject:Career Counselling

Curriculum::The Doon School Curriculum

Course Content

S Form

  • Build and maintain a positive selfconcept
  • Act appropriately to manage their own career
  • Participate in lifelong learning to support life and work goals
  • Locate information and use it effectively
  • Understand the relationship between work and society and the economy
  • Make and review learning and career plans
  • Make life- and career-enhancing decisions

SC Form

  • Build and maintain a positive selfconcept
  • Interact positively and effectively with others
  • Change and grow throughout life
  • Participate in lifelong learning to support life and work goals
  • Locate information and use it effectively
  • Understand the relationship between work and society and the economy
  • Make and review learning and career plans
  • Make life- and career-enhancing decisions
  • Act appropriately to manage their own career

Learning Objectives

  • Develop skills in maintaining a positive self-concept within the immediate environment, and with time in the wider community
  • Gain a better understanding of one’s qualities, values, skills and strengths
  • Draw up strategies to develop their capabilities and identify life and work interests
  • Develop a CV, portfolio and other relevant documents needed for higher education application and making career choices
  • Understand the college application and job search processes
  • Sharpen skills in accessing and interpreting career information and resources from a range of sources
  • Have information on subject choices that will support their career options
  • Learn about employment rights, roles and responsibilities
  • Develop an understanding of the concept of the global marketplace
  • Develop skills in career planning by doing research on possible career options and making informed decisions
  • Have knowledge and understanding of the demands and costs of further education and training
  • To meet the costs of further education, search information on the range of possibilities, such as scholarships, awards, grants and loans
  • Develop skills in relating to people of diverse cultures in the wider community
  • Develop skills in coping with self-directed learning in preparation for learning at tertiary level

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Thinking, participating and contributing.
  • Managing self in relation to others
  • Research skills
  • Creating résumé and portfolio for college admission and job application
  • Ability to take informed and realistic decisions regarding one’s life and career

General Comments

Careers lessons focus on the relation of aptitudes and skills with career options and help students choose the right course at college. Students are taught to make an effective use of information collated through their research by maintaining their own ‘research-excel sheets’. The importance of transcripts and ‘going beyond’ the syllabus for admission to colleges is emphasized, and students are encouraged to take up academic online courses and attend summer schools. Feedback from the ex-students of the school is also shared to help students prepare better.

Boys are encouraged to attend Career talks and college fairs organized by the School to gain a better understanding of the application process and get first-hand information about the culture and environment of different colleges and universities. The Careers department also extends guidance and support to students and their parents with regard to financial planning, to meet the costs of attendance at colleges across India and abroad, by giving out information on scholarships and bursaries.

In the SC Form, students are given personalized attention through individual meetings with members of the Careers department. The counselors draw up college lists and course options with each student and provide each student a step-by-step guidance through every stage of the application process. They are also provided a close guidance in writing their SOPs and college admission essays. The Doon School curriculum guide must be read in conjunction with the careers guide as a separate detailed publication.

English (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of English

Subject:English

Curriculum::ISC

Course Content

The school follows the ISC prescribed syllabus. Through their S and SC forms the students read through William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, 15 short stories from Hues: An Anthology of Short Stories and 15 poems from Star Light. Detailed description of the course may be found at http://www.cisce.org/data/Syllabus for ISC 2011/ISC Appendix -I-Listof Prescribed TextBooks.pdf

In Language the students learn the arts of essay writing, report writing, general comprehension and functional grammar.

In Literature in English the students study three texts of Literature from a choice of five prescribed texts, across the genres of drama, prose fiction and poetry. The texts are chosen by the teacher. The syllabus is different in S and SC forms. The department tries to provide a comprehensive understanding of literature through this course.

The School at S and Sc Forms also offers the elective subject of Literature in English. Unlike Core English this component is taught through different sets of text in S and Sc. The final Board exam taken by the boys is on the texts of the Sc form only. Like the Core component the entire year has two report card examinations and two trials. In the each term there is a report card test and a trial. Internal assessment for these involves allocation of 100% marks to a three-hour examination paper. Students take one written paper of 100 marks at both the trials and one 1 ½ hour paper of literature of 100 marks in the report card tests. The details of the syllabus and assessment can be found at http://www.cisce.org/data/Syllabus for ISC 2011/8. ISC Literature in English.pdf

Learning Objectives

The English Department, with its 8-member faculty team, is at the heart of all activities at The Doon School. Through the department’s involvement in academics, publications, activities, literary tours and trips, awards, public speaking, debating and participation in various international competitions, the English department seeks to develop a well-rounded creative child. Any child, who diligently walks through all the avenues that the department offers should be able to cultivate diligent reading habits, ability to participate in a variety of discourses and should be cognitively and linguistically capable of holding forth on a broad array of issues. Finally, the English Department is not merely a Language Department; the teachers deal with, not merely the teaching of the language, but also the elements of Literature, Philosophy, Human Sciences and Theory of Knowledge.

Skills Acquired by Students

The department believes that by the end of SC form every child must be equipped with the ability to undertake education for graduation in any subject in any university. The student must have an appetite for reading, a felicity with lateral thinking and have flair with the language that will allow him to express any opinion with clarity and confidence in any forum.

Examination Board

In the S and SC form the school takes the ISC board examination as well as the IB. The syllabus for the ISC is as prescribed by the CISCE. The internal examination system followed, as of yet, is the structured middle and end of term written exam pattern of the CISCE. The IB students follow the same time schedule but a different pattern of testing and evaluation.

General Comments

As the foundation for any subject, English language and literature is the source to virtually all the careers. Specialization as IB HL and at graduation can lead to careers in journalism, creative writing, academics, consultancy, advertisement, copywriting, media, performance, etc. Detailed description of the course may be found at http://www.cisce.org/data/Syllabus for ISC 2011/ISC Appendix – I – List of Prescribed Text Books.pdf

English (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of English

Subject:English

Curriculum::IB

Course Content

The IB Language A1 program is a varied and demanding programme. The Group 1 consists of three courses.

  • Language A: literature
  • Language A: language and literature
  • Literature and performance (interdisciplinary subject)

For details please go to http://xmltwo.ibo.org/publications/DP/Group1/d_1_a1lan_gui_1102_1a/html/ibpublishing.ibo.org/testexist/rest/app/pub.xql@doc=d_1_a1lan_gui_1102_1a_e&part=1&chapter=1.html

However, at The Doon School we offer only the language A: literature course, where the focus is directed towards developing an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism and promoting the ability to form independent literary.

The School and the English Department endorse the IBO’s understanding of the purpose that Language A1 is to serve:

“The study of texts, both literary and non-literary, provides a focus for developing an understanding of how language works to create meanings in a culture, as well as in particular texts. All texts may be understood according to their form, content, purpose and audience, and through the social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts that produce and value them. Responding to, and producing, texts promotes an understanding of how language sustains or challenges ways of thinking and being.”

The English A: Literature programme has four parts:

Part 1: World Literature

The World Literature section requires study of works translated into English chosen from the Prescribed Literature Texts (PLT) list of the IB. It is intended to give insight into other cultures. Assessment for the section is based on two essays, at least one of which compares works by two different authors. They are scored by IB and the scores form part of the exam score for the A1 course. World Literature develops a global view, a feeling for other cultures, an ability to compare differences, develops organizational skill in writing.

Part 2: Detailed Study

The detailed study works are to be chosen from the Prescribed list of authors (PLA) of the IB. one work from each of the genres (poetry, drama, prose fiction and prose non-fiction) has to be chosen as per the grade’s requirement. Detailed Study trains students to study a work closely, develops scholarship and close careful reading, the ability to organise and to make oral presentations.

Part 3: Groups of Works

The ‘Group of Works’ also called ‗Genre Studies’ is a set of works by authors mentioned in the PLA. This part is examined by the IBO in an end-of-diploma examination. Groups of Works teaches the ability to write a long, well-organised paper on a collection of works, develops exam-taking skills, the ability to analyze difficult texts, study skills and strategies, note-taking, and discussion skills.

Part 4: School’s Free Choice

One section of the program is freely chosen by the school, with the IB requirement that the works have ‘literary merit’. Students give individual oral presentations on these works, teaching the class for a short time. The purpose of part four is to offer teachers and students a chance to pursue works of specific interest to them, with possible thematic links to parts 1 and 3, and to develop students’ skills at presenting ideas and information to groups effectively.

Course division as per Grade requirement

Part of the course

  • Part 1: Works in translation
  • Part 2: Detailed study
  • Part 3: Literary genres
  • Part 4: Options

SL

  • Study of two works in translation from the prescribed literature in translation (PLT) list
  • Study of two works, each of a different genre, chosen from this PLA
  • Study of three works of the same genre, chosen from this PLA
  • Study of three works freely chosen

HL

  • Study of three works in translation from the PLT list
  • Study of three works, each of a different genre (one of which must be poetry), chosen from this PLA
  • Study of four works of the same genre, chosen from this PLA
  • Study of three works freely chosen

As per the recommendation of the IBO, every year the syllabus is structured around some key ideas. For instance, the Doon School syllabus for the year 2012-1014 is structured around the core ideas of the politics of gender and class, colonialism and displacement.

Syllabus

Part 1: World Literature

1. Ngugi wa Thiong’O (Gikuyu; Kenya) Matigari (1987)

2. Ariel Dorfman (Spanish; Chile) Death and the Maiden

3. Sophocles (Greek; Greece) Antigone

Part 2: Detailed Study

1. William Shakespeare Macbeth

2. John Keats* Selected Poetry

On First looking Into Chapman’s Homer, Last Sonnet, La Belle Dame Sans Merci, Ode to Psyche, Indolence: an Ode, Ode to the Nightingale, To Autumn, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode to Fanny, A Draught of Sunshine, A Song About Myself, A Thing of Beauty (Endymion), Bards of Passion and of Mirth, A Draught of Sunshine

3. Robert Browning* Selected Poetry

Meeting at Night, Parting at Morning, Two in Campagna, The Last Ride Together, My Last Duchess; Porphyria’s Lover; Abt Vogler; A Woman’s Last Words; The Lost Mistress; My Star; Now!; The Pied-Piper of Hamlyn; A Toccata of Galuppi’s; Why I am a Liberal; Youth and Art; Verse-making was the Least of my Virtues

4. Margaret Atwood Penelopiad

Part 3: Genre Study

1. WH Auden: Selected Poems

Miss Gee; As I Walked Out One Evening; Dear, though the Night is Gone; Lullaby; Epitaph on a Tyrant; Refugee Blues; The Unknown Citizen; The Shield of Achilles; Funeral Blues; O What is That Sound That So Thrills the Ear; Sept 1, 1939; Nocturne II; Fleet Visit; Their Lonely Betters; Song (Deftly, admiral, cast your fly)

2. Ted Hughes: Selected Poems

The Thought-Fox; Wind; Pike; Full Moon and Little Frieda; Crow Tyrannosaurus; Ravens; Crow ; Blacker than Ever; Lovesong; Tractor; Wolfwatching; The Owl; Hawk Roosting; The Harvest Moon; Crow’s Theology; Examination at the Womb-Door

3. Seamus Heaney: from Death of a Naturalist

Digging; Death of a Naturalist; Advancement of Learning; The Early Purges; Follower; Ancestral Photograph; Mid-Term Break; At a Potato Digging; Turkeys Observed; Trout; Gravities; Twice Shy; Poem; Scaffolding; Storm on the Island; The Folk Singers

4. Carol Ann Duffy: from The World’s Wife

Queen Herod; Mrs Midas; Mrs Aesop; Mrs Darwin; Mrs Sisyphus; Mrs Faust; Anne Hathaway; Medusa; The Devil’s Wife; Mrs Icarus; Frau Freud; Eurydice; Penelope; Mrs Beast; Demeter

5. Arthur Miller Death of a Salesman

6. Oscar Wilde Importance of Being Earnest

7. G. B. Shaw Candida

Part 4: School’s Free Choice

1. Saadat Hasan Manto Toba Tek Singh and Other Stories

2. Jhumpa Lahiri The Interpreter of Maladies

3. Amitav Ghosh Dancing in Cambodia, At Large in Burma

4. Bapsi Sidwa Ice Candy Man

Learning Objectives

The English Department, with its 8-member faculty team, is at the heart of all activities at The Doon School. Through the department’s involvement in academics, publications, activities, literary tours and trips, awards, public speaking, debating and participation in various international competitions, the English department seeks to develop a well-rounded creative child. Any child, who diligently walks through all the avenues that the department offers should be able to cultivate diligent reading habits, ability to participate in a variety of discourses and should be cognitively and linguistically capable of holding forth on a broad array of issues. Finally, the English Department is not merely a Language Department; the teachers deal with, not merely the teaching of the language, but also the elements of Literature, Philosophy, Human Sciences and Theory of Knowledge.

The department believes that by the end of SC form IB every child must be equipped with the ability to undertake education for graduation in any subject in any university.

The student develops an appetite for reading, a felicity with lateral thinking and has flair with the language that allows him to express any opinion with clarity and confidence in any forum. The student will be able to have intelligent conversation on any literary work with laypeople and literary connoisseurs alike. The rigours of the IB course equip a student with the ability to develop and sustain valid points of views and opinions about literature, politics, social issues and identity. In short, IB students walk out tall as men of the world.

Examination Board

In the S and Sc form the school also takes the IB Diploma Programme. The English A syllabus for the IBDP is structured on the guidelines set by the IBO. The internal examination system followed, as of yet, is the structured middle and end of term written exam pattern of the IB, which includes open-book examinations, oral commentaries and presentations, internal assessment based on online learning participation, blogs and written essays.

General Comments

As the foundation for any subject, English language and literature is the source to virtually all the careers. Specialization as IB HL and at graduation can lead to careers in journalism, creative writing, academics, consultancy, advertisement, copywriting, media, performance, etc. Detailed description of the course may be found at http://www.cisce.org/data/Syllabus for ISC 2011/ISC Appendix – I – List of Prescribed Text Books.pdf

Modern Foreign Languages – French

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Modern Foreign Languages

Subject:French

Curriculum::IB

Course Content

S Form

  • Personal information
  • Appearance and character
  • Personal relations
  • Daily routine and habits
  • Education
  • Health and fitness
  • Sports
  • Careers

SC Form

  • Vacations
  • Transport
  • Towns and neighbourhood
  • Weather
  • Physical geography
  • World problems
  • Environmental issues
  • Media
  • Technology

Learning Objectives

  • Linking of languages with another culture
  • Appreciation of different points of view in different cultures
  • Develop intercultural understanding
  • Promote tolerance of other cultures, a must in the youth of today
  • Helping them appreciate art, literature, cinema and music in other cultures
  • Understanding the role of languages in other fields of knowledge
  • Allow the students to use the learnt language in different contexts and diverse means

General Comments

For the IB ab initio course, the students begin from the start, and most of them are total beginners, and hence cover a wide range of topics. They have to focus on grammar and vocabulary, but learning a language in IB is not only restricted to grammar and vocabulary. The student now is an interactive individual with his social environment. While learning a language, he also discovers an associated culture. The socio-cultural components of the language consists of, in a vast majority, communication skills. Intercultural understanding is the primary objective of learning a language, and they promote tolerance and positive behaviour.

Modern Foreign Languages – German

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Foreign Languages

Subject:German

Curriculum::IB

Course Content

S Form

  • Self-Introduction
  • Café, Eateries, eating habits
  • Daily activities
  • German language and culture
  • Personality and looks
  • Appointments
  • Orientation, (places of work, cities, city plans, maps, calendar etc.)
  • Professions
  • Excursion through German cities
  • Vacation
  • Fashions and seasons
  • Body and Health
  • Entertainment and Television

SC Form

  • Languages
  • Family, Relationships and Friends
  • Germans in foreign counties and foreigners in Germany
  • Environmental issues
  • Journeys
  • Industry, Work culture and Economics
  • Science and technology in Germany

Learning Objectives

S Form

  • Understanding of the German way of response (sentence structure, conjugation and basic grammar through texts and multimedia)
  • Getting a hang of the German culture
  • Understanding the geographical part of the country
  • Usage of language in different situations (basic Grammar patterns)

SC Form

  • Understanding of the German economy as a part of its culture
  • Getting a hang of the current German trends in the areas of environment and Science and technology in Germany
  • German Language Trends and usage on the social networking sites
  • Seeing the advertisements and flyers (usage of German magazines like Deutsch Perfekt and PASCH website)

Skills Acquired by Students

S Form

  • Basic Grammar (Present and PERFEKT tense, prepositions, long sentence structure)
  • Vocabulary for the topics
  • Written responses such as letter writing, recipes, postcard
  • Photo/picture description

SC Form

  • Essay writing
  • Blog writing
  • Vocabulary for the topics
  • Expressing complex issues in simple language such as Initiates by Germany in the field of renewable energy

General Comments

S Form

This particular course content focuses on understanding of expressions through important mediums such as letter writing, email writing and postcard making. From ―self introduction to entertainment and television”, this entire syllabus covers a very important aspect of oral and aural skills as well. By watching short films based on the syllabus and by hearing German, students will be able to pick up and exercise the oral skills as well. Orientation of the particular country is absolutely necessary for a student. Through maps, food guides and recipes, one will be able to understand the weather patterns and living patterns of Germany in particular. A student will able to locate and focus Germany’s place in Europe and in the world through its language and culture.

Comparison of the immediate surrounding with the target language is emphasized, as it will enhance the ability of a student to relate customs and traditions of that country to his/her immediate world.

SC Form

This particular course will take back students to their basic understanding of the language and then carry it forward through long essay writing skills. By seeing advertisements and flyers, they will be able to grasp the situations currently prevailing in Germany. They will be able to understand the student life in Germany and about various academic opportunities for Students in Germany. By visiting social networking sites in German language, they will be able to relate their working knowledge of the language to their mother tongue and then take it further while reading German blogs and making some German friends. Students will be trained to express on current topics related to Germany and India through class discussions and interview. They are encouraged to write their views on PASCH website and thereby look and reflect critically on the topics.

Hindi

एस तथा एस. सी. फामम (आई. एस. सी.)

Department:परीक्षा बोर्म

एस पाभम भें ऩयीऺाएॊ घयेरू ही होती हैं, ऩयन्तु प्रश्न-ऩत्र प्रारूऩ, भूलमाॊकन तथा ऩाठ्मक्रभ विकास आई. सी. एस.ई. के भानदॊडों के आधाय ऩय ककमा जाता है|

पाठ्यक्रम

एस तथा एस सी. कऺाओॊ के छात्रों से मह अऩेऺा की जाती है कक िे स्ऩष्ट औय भुखय अभबव्मक्तत कयने भें सऺभ हों तथा स्िीकृत िातमरूऩों सॊयचनाओॊ का उऩमोग कयते हुए भुहाियेदाय बाषा भरख औय सभझ सकें | इस उद्देश्म की ऩूर्त म के भरए उन्हें गहन ऻान औय साहहत्म के अभबभूलमाॉ की ओय क्रभश: प्रेरयत ककमा जाता है|

हभ ित्तमभान भें इन कऺाओॊ भें काउॊभसर द्िाया र्नधामरयत ऩाठ्मक्रभ का प्रमोग कय यहे हैं|

एक कऺा का काममबाय एक ही अध्माऩक को हदमा जाता है औय इस फात का बी प्रमत्न ककमा जाता है कक दोनों िषम एक कऺा एक ही अध्माऩक के ऩास यहे| हभाया भानना है कक इससे र्नयॊतयता फनी यहती है| साथ ही छात्र-अध्माऩक की आऩसी सभझ बी र्नयॊतय विकभसत होती यहती है क्जसका राब अॊतत: छात्रों को ही प्राप्त होता है|

काउंससऱ द्वारा निर्ामररत पाठ्य-पुस्तकें

  • काव्म तयॊग
  • र्नभमरा
  • कथा सुयभब
  • ज्िाराभुखी के पूर

काउॊभसर द्िाया र्नधामरयत इन चाय ऩुस्तकों भें से कभ से कभ ककन्हीॊ तीन ऩुस्तकों का अध्ममन छात्रों को दो िषों भें कयना होता है| अध्माऩक अऩनी कऺा के छात्रों की रूचच औय मोग्मता को ध्मान भें यखते हुए ऩुस्तकों का चुनाि रेते हैं| सबी िगों के अध्माऩकों के ऩास अऩनी इच्छा से ऩुस्तकों के चमन का अचधकाय होता है|

रचिा

छात्रों भें यचनात्भकता का विकास कयने के भरए उन्हें र्नमभभत रूऩ से र्नफॊध-यचना, कहानी रेखन औय आरेख रेखन आहद का अभ्मास कयामा जाता है| इस विषम भें इस फात का विशेष ध्मान यखा जाता है कक रेखन के विषम रक्षऺत आमुिगम के अनुबि तथा भानभसक, फौविक एिॊ बािनात्भक विकास से जुड़े हुए हों|

बोर् एवं प्रनतवचि

बावषक सभझ, तथ्म की सभझ तथा प्रर्तिचन की मोग्मता का विकास कयने के भरए छात्रों को सभम सभम ऩय अऩहित गद्माॊशों के ऩिन औय उन ऩय आधारयत प्रश्नों के उत्तय देने का अभ्मास कयामा जाता है|

व्याकरण

कऺा भें भुहािये, रोकोक्ततमाॉ, िचन, भरगॊ , ऩमाममिाची, विशेषण, विरोभ शब्द, सॊऻा, सिमनाभ, विशेषण, िातमयचना एिॊ शुिीकयण आहद का अभ्मास र्नमभभत औय मोजनाफि रूऩ से कयामा जाता है|

भाषषक भाषषक कौशऱ

विबाग का ऩूया ध्मान छात्रों के बावषक कौशर के विकास ऩय बी यहता है| इस उद्देश्म की ऩूर्त म के भरए कऺा भें सभम सभम ऩय द्रश्म औय श्रव्म भाध्मभों का प्रमोग ककमा जाता है|

अभ्यास

  • कऺा एिॊ कऺा से इतय विविध सृजनात्भक एिॊ फहुभाध्मभीम स्रोतों के भाध्मभ से फच्चों भें बाषा औय साहहत्म के प्रर्त रूचच एिॊ सभझ का विकास|
  • अधोभरखखत कक्रमा कराऩ का कऺाओॊ भें र्नमभभत रूऩ से सॊचारन –
    • यचनात्भक रेखन
    • अभबनम
    • िाद-वििाद
    • प्रश्नोत्तयी
    • सभाॊ-साभर्मक विषमों ऩय सभमानुसाय कामम
    • ऩुस्तकारम एिॊ सूचना के अन्म स्रोतों का उऩमोग
  • ऩाि-मोजना का र्नमभभत प्रमोग

षवभागीय संस्थाएं, प्रकाशि तथा अन्य पाठ्यक्रमेत क्रक्रया-कऱाप

हहन्दी विबाग द्िाया ऩूये िषम छात्रों की फौविक, भानभसक तथा सौन््मफोधात्भक आिश्मकताओॊ को ध्मान भें यखते हुए विविध कक्रमा-कराऩों का आमोजन ककमा जाता यहता है|

विबाग द्िाया कर्नष्ि िगम के छात्रों के भरए मुि-बायती तथा िरयष्ि िगम के छात्रों के भरए बायत-िाणी नाभक दो सॊस्थाओॊ का सॊचारन ककमा जाता है| इन सॊस्थाओॊ की र्नमभभत रूऩ से होने िारी सबाओॊ भें िाद-वििाद, सािमजर्नक बाषण, कविता-ऩाि तथा यचनात्भक रेखन आहद का भ्मास कयामा जाता है|

विबाग द्िाया ड दून स्कूर िीकरी, अऩमण औय प्रमास आहद प्रकाशनों के भाध्मभ से छात्रों को रेखन औय प्रकाशन से जुड़े ऩहरुओॊ से ऩरयचचत कयामा जाता है|

विबाग द्िाया र्नमभभत रूऩ से नाट्म प्रस्तुर्तमाॉ की जाती है| इनभें कर्नष्ि तथा िरयष्ि िगम के छात्रों को अऩनी प्रर्तबा उबायने का अिसय भभरता है| हहन्दी विबाग ऩूये िषम िाद-वििाद, यचनात्भक रेखन, बाषण, काव्म-ऩाि आहद की प्रर्तमोचगता आमोक्जत कयता यहता है| इस प्रकाय की अॊतविमद्मारमीम प्रर्तमोचगताओॊ भें बी छात्रों को बाग रेने के ण केिर प्रोत्साहहत ककमा जाता है, अवऩतु उन्हें ऩूयी तैमायी के साथ बाग रेने के भरए बेजा बी जता है|

Humanities – Geography (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Humanities

Subject:Geography

Curriculum::ISC

Course Content

S Form

Theory

  • Geography – Its Interdisciplinary Approach and Future Prospects
  • Earth’s Interior
  • Changing Face of the Earth
  • Atmosphere
  • The Realms of Water
  • Biosphere – Life on the Earth
  • World Climatic types

Paper II: Practical Work and Project Work (30 Marks)

Candidates will be required to undertake the following Practical work and Project work:

  • Practical Work
  • Any three of the following four topics to be undertaken.
    • Surveying
    • Statistical
    • Map projections
    • Aerial photographs
  • Project Work (Assignment)
  • Fieldwork to understand any physical phenomena in the local or selected area to illustrate the physical processes (Only one topic as an assignment of not more than 10-12 pages of written text excluding pages for pictures and maps).

SC Form

Scope of Map Work

  • Locational Setting of India
  • Mountains
  • Plains
  • Plateaus
  • Lakes
  • Water Bodies
  • Passes
  • Rivers

Theory

  • Climate of India
  • Natural Vegetation
  • Population
  • Resources of India
  • Agriculture
  • Minerals
  • Power resources
  • Nuclear Power

Learning Objectives

  • To enable candidates to acquire knowledge (information) and to develop an understanding of facts, terms, symbols concepts, principles, generalizations, hypotheses, problems, trends, processes and methods of Geography at the national and global level
  • To apply the knowledge of the principles of Physical Geography in explaining the causes and consequences of natural hazards and suggest ways of coping with them through sustainable development
  • To develop skills of drawing maps, surveying, and drawing statistical diagrams and thematic maps
  • To develop an interest in Geography

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Map Reading
  • Knowledge about our planet, its systems and phenomena impacting it
  • Analyzing and interpreting geographical data

General Comments

The Geography curriculum intends to impart the very essential skills of map reading, map interpretation, relating data to real-life situations and, of course, to have an indepth understanding of the various aspects of the developments within a region in the context of the geographical and climatic conditions of the area under study. This subject explores the impact of human activities on various natural phenomena, which in turn, affect the climatic and geographic conditions of the region.

There will be two papers in the subject. Paper I: Theory (70 Marks) This paper is of three hours duration and divided into two parts – Part I (30 marks) will be compulsory and will consist of Section A and Section B. Section A will include compulsory short answer questions testing knowledge, application and skills related to elementary/fundamental aspects of the entire syllabus. Section B will consist of one question on map work. Part II (40 marks) will consist of seven questions. Candidates will be required to answer four out of seven questions. Each question in this part shall carry 10 marks.

Humanities – History (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Humanities

Subject: History

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Indian History

  • The Rise and Growth of British Power (1740-1798)
  • The Ascendancy of British Power (1798-1818)
  • Consolidation of British Power (1818-1857)
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Impact of British Rule
  • The Uprisings against British Rule
  • Social and Cultural Awakening during the 19th Century
  • The Dawn and rise of Indian Nationalism (1885-1905)

Aspects of World History

  • The First World War (1914-1918)
  • The Search for International Order between 1919-1939
  • The Great Depression
  • The development of Communism: USSR and China
  • Japan: restoration to parliamentary democracy

SC Form

Indian History

  • The Growth of Radical Nationalism (at the turn of the 20th Century)
  • Communal Factors in Indian Politics (1885-1919)
  • Communal Factors in Indian Politics (1885-1919)
  • The Last Phase (1935-1947)
  • Post Independence India (1947-1962)

Aspects of World History

  • Fascism and Nazism
  • The Collapse of International Order in the 1930s
  • The Second World War 1939 -1945
  • Tension and Co-operation after the Second World War
  • The Middle East

Learning Objectives

  • To provide accurate knowledge of the most significant events and personalities of the period under study, in sequence and in context
  • To familiarize candidates with factual evidence upon which explanations or judgements about the period must be founded
  • To develop the capacity to marshal facts and evaluate evidence and to discuss issues from a historical point of view

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to place events in their correct context and sequence, and develop a perspective
  • Ability to interpret sources, evaluate their reliability, and critically analyze historical events
  • Familiarity with historiographical issues in both World and Indian History

General Comments

This curriculum will enable students to develop a sense of historical continuity, encourage the diminution of ethnocentric prejudices and to develop a more international approach to world history. Students will also become familiar with the problems in evaluating and interpreting various kinds of source materials.

For assessment purposes, there will be one paper of three hours duration of 100 marks divided into two parts.

Part I (20 marks) will consist of compulsory short answer questions testing fundamental factual knowledge and understanding of the entire syllabus.

Part II (80 marks) will be divided into two sections, Section A and Section B, each consisting of five questions. Each question shall carry 16 marks.

Candidates will be required to attempt two questions from each Section and one question from either Section A or Section B. A total of five questions will be attempted from Part II.

Humanities – Political Science (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Humanities

Subject: Political Science

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Section A: Political Theory

  • Fundamental Ideas
  • The Origin of the State
  • Modern Theories of the State
  • The Purpose of the State
  • Sovereignty
  • Law
  • Liberty
  • Equality
  • Citizenship

Forms of Government

Section B: Modern Constitutions -India

SC Form

Section A: Political Theory

  • Classification of States
  • Modern States
  • Constitution

Section B

  • The Separation of Powers
  • Franchise and Representation
  • Organs of the Government
  • Democracy in India – A Perspective of the Challenges Faced

Learning Objectives

  • To enable candidates to acquire knowledge concerning Political Science
  • To enable candidates to apply acquired knowledge and understanding of procedures and the practices of governance in unfamiliar situations
  • To develop an interest in the problems related to the structure of governments and political life of the people of one’s country and those of the world

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Research skills
  • Reflection
  • Analytical abilities

General Comments

There will be one paper of three hours duration of 100 marks divided into two parts. Part I (30 marks) will consist of compulsory short answer questions, testing knowledge, application and skills relating to elementary/ fundamental aspects of the entire syllabus.

Part II (70 marks) will be divided into two sections A & B. Candidates will be required to answer three questions out of five from Section A and two questions out of three from Section B. Each question in this part shall carry 14 marks.

The curriculum is designed to develop students’ understanding of the functioning of the various political institutions and systems, the evolution of political philosophy and their practice in various modern nations. It also enables students to develop better understanding and respect for other systems and develop a more international approach to their study of the subject.

Humanities – Psychology (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Humanities

Subject: Psychology

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Paper – I (Theory)

Section A

  • The Subject Psychology
  • Methods of Psychology
  • Attention and Perception

Section B

  • Emotions and Motivation
  • Learning
  • Remembering and Forgetting
  • Thinking, Problem-solving and Creativity

Paper – II (Practical Work)

SC Form

Paper I (Theory)

Section A

  • Intelligence and Ability
  • Personality

Section B

  • Lifespan Development
  • Stress and Stress Management
  • Psychological Disorders and Psychotherapy
  • Social Thought and Social Behaviour
  • Attitudes
  • Applications of Psychology

Paper – II (Practical Work)

Learning Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of human behaviour: the nature of individuals and of members of social groups
  • To develop an understanding of the methods of research and study employed in Psychology
  • To develop an appreciation of the practical value of Psychology and its applications in daily life

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Better understanding of human behaviour
  • Familiarity with methods of research in the subject
  • Awareness of different approaches to Psychology

General Comments

The curriculum is assessed through two components: Theory and Practical. The theory paper consists of two parts; Part I (20 marks) will consist of compulsory short answer questions relating to the fundamental aspects of the entire syllabus. Part II (50 marks) will consist of two sections – A and B. Candidates will be required to answer two out of three questions from Section A and three out of five questions from Section B. Each question in this part shall carry 10 marks.

The Practical Part carries 30 marks where candidates will be expected to have completed two Studies/experiments from any chapter covered in Theory. Assessment will be based on a written report which should cover the Aim, Basic Concept, Method and Bibliography. This will be followed by a Viva with an external examiner. Each Practical will carry 15 Marks.

Humanities – Geography (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of Humanities

Subject:Geography

Curriculum:IB

Course Content

Part 1: Core theme—Patterns and change (SL/HL)

There are four compulsory topics in this core theme.

  • Populations in transition
  • Disparities in wealth and development
  • Patterns in environmental quality and sustainability
  • Patterns in resource consumption

Part 2: Optional themes (SL/HL)

  • There are seven optional themes. Two optional themes are required at SL.
  • Freshwater—issues and conflicts
  • Oceans and their coastal margins
  • Extreme environments
  • Hazards and disasters—risk assessment and response
  • Leisure, sport and tourism
  • The geography of food and health
  • Urban environments

Part 3: HL extension—Global interactions (HL only)

  • There are seven compulsory topics in the HL extension
  • Measuring global interactions
  • Changing space—the shrinking world
  • Economic interactions and flows
  • Environmental change
  • Socio-cultural exchanges
  • Political outcomes
  • Global interactions at the local level

Fieldwork (SL/HL)

Fieldwork, leading to one written report based on a fieldwork question, information collection and analysis with evaluation.

Learning Objectives

  • Develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment
  • Develop a concern for human welfare and the quality of the environment, and an understanding of the need for planning and sustainable management
  • Appreciate the relevance of geography in analysing contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global perspective of diversity and change.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall relevant data, facts and information
  • Understanding of the core themes in the curriculum
  • Understanding of the natural phenomena impacting our planet
  • Select, use and apply a variety of appropriate skills and techniques for enhanced learning of the subject

General Comments

The syllabus is designed to allow sufficient time for in-depth analysis, evaluation and consolidation of learning.

The methods chosen for delivering the course are based on what is most relevant to the students’ Interests. The overall aim of the course is to give students a deeper understanding of the nature and scope of geography. The different parts of the course complement each other and the geographic skills are integrated throughout the course.

The syllabus has three parts, the core theme, optional themes and the HL extension. The order of the content is not an indication of how the core theme, the optional themes and the HL extension are to be delivered. Since many topics and sub-topics are interrelated, teachers adopt a holistic approach to teaching. For example, a single case study may serve to cover several sub-topics. Only topics listed in these columns will be selected for assessment in the examination papers, although references from the introductory sections of the core theme, the optional themes and the HL extension may occasionally be used to set the context for examination questions. This curriculum is delivered over two years – Year 11 and 12 and the examination assesses the students based on their knowledge of the two years curriculum.

Humanities – History (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Humanities

Subject: EVA

Curriculum:IB

Course Content

SL/ HL Options

20th century world history—prescribed subjects (Any ONE is taught to a particular cohort)

  • Peacemaking, peacekeeping—international relations 1918–36
  • The Arab–Israeli conflict 1945–79
  • Communism in crisis 1976–89

20th century world history—topics (Any TWO is taught to a particular cohort)

  • Causes, practices and effects of wars
  • Democratic states—challenges and responses
  • Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states
  • Nationalist and independence movements in Africa and Asia and post-1945 Central and Eastern European states
  • The Cold War

HL options

Aspects of the history of Asia and Oceania

SL/HL internal assessment: Historical investigation

Learning Objectives

  • Promote an understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations.
  • Encourage an understanding of the present through critical reflection upon the past
  • Develop an awareness of one’s own historical identity through the study of the historical experiences of different cultures
  • Encourage an understanding of the impact of historical developments at national, regional and international levels

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Recall and select relevant historical knowledge
  • Demonstrate an understanding of historical processes: Cause and effect; Continuity and change
  • Understand historical sources (SL/HL paper 1)
  • Deploy detailed, in-depth knowledge (HL paper 3)
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a specific historical topic (IA)

General Comments

Throughout the Diploma Programme history course students are encouraged to develop their understanding of the methodology and practice of the discipline of history. Teaching historical skills enriches the student’s understanding of the subject and encourages the student to apply them to the future study of history or related areas. It is essential that these skills are covered throughout the syllabus, are introduced appropriately, depending on the context, and not treated in isolation. Some of these skills include developing research skills and locating and identifying relevant evidence from various sources, evaluation of such sources and an enhanced awareness and acknowledgement of historical opinions and interpretations.

The IB History curriculum is transacted over two years – Years 11 and 12. Students can opt for the Standard Level course (SL) or the Higher Level course (HL). The differences in the two courses lie in their content and assessment objectives for students opting for the two levels.

Mathematics – Mathematics (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Mathematics

Subject: Mathematics

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Section A

  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Algebra: Complex Numbers, Quadratic Equations, Finite and Infinite Sequences, Permutations and Combinations, Mathematical Induction, Binomial Theorem and Properties of Binomial Coefficients
  • Trigonometry: Angles and Arc Lengths, Trigonometric Functions, Compound and Multiple Angles and Trigonometric Equations
  • Calculus: Basic Concepts of Relations and Functions, Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus
  • Coordinate Geometry: Points and their Coordinates, The Straight Line and Circles
  • Statistics: Measures of central tendency, Standard deviation, Combined mean and standard deviation

Section B

  • Vectors
  • Coordinate Geometry in 3 Dimensions

Section C

  • Statistics
  • Average Due Date

SC Form

Section A

  • Determinants and Matrices
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Conics: Parabola, Ellipse and Hyperbola
  • Inverse Trigonometric Functions
  • Calculus: Differential Calculus and Integral Calculus
  • Correlation and Regression
  • Probability
  • Complex Numbers
  • Differential Equations

Section B

  • Vectors
  • Coordinate Geometry in 3 Dimensions: Lines and Planes
  • Probability

Section C

  • Discount
  • Annuities
  • Linear Programming
  • Application of Derivatives in Commerce and Economics
  • Index Numbers and Moving Averages

Note: Students have a choice to attempt either section B or C.

Learning Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of the terms, concepts and formulas at Senior Secondary level;
  • To give deeper understanding of the topics in Mathematics at this level;
  • To develop the potential of correlating knowledge of various topics and apply it in various fields.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Development of skills to apply mathematical knowledge to solve real life problems
  • Using technology (computers and calculators) to enhance their learning
  • Application of multiple strategies to approach various problems

General Comments

The syllabus of S and SC forms is designed and taught in such a way that:

  • It develops an understanding of applications of Mathematics in other areas.
  • It develops the scientific approach to visualize, analyse and draw conclusions.
  • It motivates the students to investigate and explore various areas in which mathematical concepts can be applied.
  • It develops logical reasoning, patience and the ability to persist to solve real life problems.
  • It teaches the applications of technology (mathematical softwares and various tools) in Mathematics and combining the knowledge of two fields to find solutions to various problems.
  • It develops an appreciation for the role of Mathematics in everyday life.

Mathematics – Mathematics (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Mathematics

Subject: Mathematics

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

S and SC forms

Mathematical Studies SL:

  • Topic 1— Number and algebra
  • Topic 2— Descriptive statistics
  • Topic 3— Logics, sets and probability
  • Topic 4— Statistical applications
  • Topic 5— Geometry and trigonometry
  • Topic 6— Mathematical models
  • Topic 7— Introduction to differential calculus
  • Project

Mathematics SL:

  • Topic 1— Algebra
  • Topic 2— Functions and equations
  • Topic 3— Circular functions and trigonometry
  • Topic 4— Vectors
  • Topic 5— Statistics and probability
  • Topic 6— Calculus
  • Mathematical exploration

Mathematics HL:

Core

  • Topic 1— Algebra
  • Topic 2— Functions and equations
  • Topic 3— Circular functions and trigonometry
  • Topic 4— Vectors
  • Topic 5— Statistics and probability
  • Topic 6— Calculus

Options (one of the topic from topic no. 7, 8, 9 & 10)

  • Topic 7 — Statistics and probability
  • Topic 8 — Sets, relations and groups
  • Topic 9 — Calculus
  • Topic 10 — Discrete mathematics
  • Mathematical exploration

Further Mathematics:

  • Topic 1— Linear algebra
  • Topic 2— Geometry
  • Topic 3— Statistics and probability
  • Topic 4— Sets, relations and groups
  • Topic 5— Calculus
  • Topic 6— Discrete mathematics

Learning Objectives

  • To develop an understanding of the terms, concepts and formulas at Senior Secondary level;
  • To give deeper understanding of the topics in Mathematics at this level;
  • To develop the potential of correlating knowledge of various topics and apply it in various fields.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Development of skills to apply mathematical knowledge to solve real life problems
  • Using technology (computers and calculators) to enhance their learning
  • Application of multiple strategies to approach various problems

General Comments

The syllabus of S and SC forms is designed and taught in such a way that:

  • It develops an understanding of applications of Mathematics in other areas.
  • It develops the scientific approach to visualize, analyse and draw conclusions.
  • It motivates the students to investigate and explore various areas in which mathematical concepts can be applied.
  • It develops logical reasoning, patience and the ability to persist to solve real life problems.
  • It teaches the applications of technology (mathematical softwares and various tools) in Mathematics and combining the knowledge of two fields to find solutions to various problems.
  • It develops an appreciation for the role of Mathematics in everyday life.

Music – Hindustani – Vocal, Instrumental (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Music

Subject: Hindustani Music (Vocal/Instrumental)

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

Theory: Musical sound, Swaras, Varna,Alankar,Taal.

Theory: Forms of composition and types of ragas.

Theory: Complete theory of set ragas and notation

Theory: Contribution of eminent musicians — their lives and works

Practical: Singing/playing of Khayal of set ragas with alap, Bola lap, sargam, tans

Practical: Dhrupad in any one of the set ragas

Practical: Use of self-made alap and appropriate use of certain grace notes.

Learning Objectives

  • In-depth understanding of shruties, swaras, thats
  • Notation writing of note combinations, songs with alaap and taans
  • Demonstration of ragas with improvisation

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Holding, handling, tuning and performing the instrument with confidence and familiarity
  • Ability to bring out expressive and creative nuances of a composition
  • Analytical and appreciative ability as a listener
  • Communicating musically as a solo performing artiste

General Comments

The subject is designed to encourage and nurture creativity of musical expression. To achieve this, thorough and in-depth knowledge of the structure, idiom and theory of music is imparted. Critical appreciation and understanding is fostered through examining and listening to the music of eminent exponents from different gharaanas. Singing/playing of an advanced level, incorporating self-made alaaps and improvisation, and being able to understand and demonstrate diverse styles and forms is an essential element of the subject, helping the student to be able to give solo performances of a high calibre. Versatility in music-making is taught through ensemble playing, and an understanding of diverse tone-colours and textures in a range of instruments and vocal techniques.

Music – Hindustani – Tabla (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Music

Subject: Hindustani Music (Tabla)

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

Theory: Lives and styles of leading exponents

Theory: Taal notation, rotation and Pranas of taal

Theory: Pakhawaj taals

Practical: Accompaniment of Thekas, production and identification of syllables, compositions from different gharaanas.

Learning Objectives

  • Advanced and in-depth understanding of Layakaries and wazan of Taal
  • Identification of gharaanas, through stylistic hallmarks
  • Essay writing, covering a wide range of music-related topics, including contemporary popular music, electronics in music, etc.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to perform accompanying Taals to different styles of Hindustani classical, light classical and popular music
  • An in-depth appreciation of complex Taals and application of theoretical knowledge to performance
  • Presenting a solo performance incorporating tukdas, kayadas, chakradhars, tihais and laggis to a nagma (fixed melodic pattern)

General Comments

The subject teaches advanced skills in 56able playing, with technical proficiency, high tempo and dynamic control. It imparts an appreciation of the styles and playing techniques unique to all the major gharaanas of Hindustani music, with an ability to recognize the styles. It encompasses 56able and other Indian percussion instrument playing from ancient to present times, including the two main streams of Hindustani classical music, Dhrupad-ang and Khayal-ang. It teaches the student to be well-versed in all theoretical aspects of music and familiar with appropriate technical terminology, as well as have a wide knowledge of exponents of 57able, instrumental and vocal classical music.

Music – Western Music (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Music

Subject: Western Music

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

Theory: Composition

Theory: Harmony – SATB and two-part

Theory: Analysis

Theory: History and Analysis of set works, lives and works of Bach, Beethoven, Schubert and Franck

Practicals: Trinity College London, advanced grade examination – pieces, technical exercises, scales, arpeggios, aural perception, sight-reading.

Aural perception tests (written)

Learning Objectives

  • Structure, devices, melodic progressions, modulations, text-painting in composing to words
  • Harmonisation, and its application to all degrees and in all inversions of major and minor keys
  • Application of technique and stylistic understanding to performance on an instrument
  • In-depth analysis and understanding of a set symphony, lied, fugue and sonata, with context and culture, and other works of the composers

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Technical, stylistic proficiency on the instrument to an advanced level
  • Thorough knowledge of the composers, forms, major works of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods of Western Art music
  • Creativity through composition
  • Aural proficiency in recognizing and writing, in staff notation, rhythms, melodies, intervals, cadences, chord progressions, modulations.

General Comments

The subject teaches, over two years, advanced musical skills in performance – notational accuracy, technical proficiency, stylistic understanding, and musical communication at an advanced level, following the Trinity College London Grade 6, or above, syllabus, with an examination at the end of the two years (Form SC). Musical dictation employing a variety of components is taught over two years as aural perception to an advanced degree. Creativity through composition, using devices of Western Art music; composition, part-writing for voices, analysis of an extract from a score, and essays analyzing in detail works of major composers of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods of Western Music , as well as their lives and works, comprise the theoretical components of the subject.

Music – Music (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Music

Subject: Music

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

Theory: Analysis through scores of two set works

Theory: Study of Western art music through scores and guided listening, World Music, jazz and popular music through guided listening with written analyses.

Theory: Researching links between music of two different cultures

Practical: Repertoire of an advanced level in an instrument for a recording of 15 minutes.

Learning Objectives

  • Technical and musical proficiency on the instrument of choice
  • Ability to understand and interpret a wide variety of styles and idioms through performance
  • Developing a musical and socio-cultural understanding of genres of music
  • Developing the ability to do independent research and produce original work
  • Cultural sensitivity

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Convincing, technically secure control of the instrument
  • Analytical skills in the elements of music such as structure, instrumentation, form, melody, harmony, texture, rhythm and tone colour
  • Ability to read symphonic and other complex scores and analyse them
  • Aural perceptiveness
  • Writing about music using appropriate terminology and displaying in-depth knowledge

General Comments

The purpose of the course is to help the student gain as broad a music education as possible. The framework of the course is such that it can be constructed to suit the student`s strengths, interests and capability in the components of performance and musical links investigation. The student is helped to develop as a performer in terms of technique, interpretive skills and versatility. Aural perceptiveness is taught to promote the ability to recognize, analyse, identify and describe, in appropriate musical terminology, music of different genres and styles from across the world. Comprehensive and eclectic listening, building a confident and communicative musical performance personality, and teaching how to research and write about music are the key elements of the course.

Sciences – Biology (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Biology

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Theory

  • Diversity of Life
  • Plant Physiology
  • Multicellularity: Structure and Functions of Animals
  • Units of Life
  • Organisms and Environment

Practical Work

  • Scientific Techniques
  • Physiology
  • Morphology
  • Cytologye
  • Spotting: (Three minutes to be given for each spot which includes identification, drawing a labelled diagram and writing two characteristics).

SC Form

Theory

  • Origin and Evolution of Life
  • Multicellularity
  • Genetics
  • Applications of Biology

Practical Work

  • Taxonomy: Study floral characteristics through dissection of flowers, drawing floral formula and diagrams
  • Simple biochemical and physiological experiments
  • Spotting (Three minutes to be given for each spot which includes identification, drawing a labelled diagram and writing two characteristics).

Learning Objectives

  • To enable candidates to acquire the knowledge and to develop an understanding of biological terms, concepts, facts, principles, formulae etc.
  • To develop the ability to apply the knowledge of biology in unfamiliar situations
  • To develop experimental skills required in biology practical work
  • To create awareness about the problems of the environment and the manner in which these problems can be overcome
  • To develop the ability to appreciate biological phenomena in nature and the contribution of biology to human welfare
  • To develop interest in plants and animals and in their respective environments;
  • To develop scientific attitude towards biological phenomena
  • To create awareness of the fundamentals of human biology, food, health, nutrition and population control

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall knowledge points
  • Understanding of the fundamental concepts
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations
  • Ability to process data and conclude
  • Association of values to learning points
  • Ability to acquire handle instruments, data collection and analysis, conclusion etc.

Examination Board

Council for the Indian School Certificate Examination (CISCE) conducts all India examination after SC Form. Apart from that other examinations in SC Form and all examinations in S Form are conducted by the school based on the board pattern. Other details related to the CISCE can be found at – http://www.cisce.org

General Comments

The study of Biology is directly related to Environmental Studies and Chemistry. The evolution of life in flora and fauna and its interpretation helps in the understanding of interrelated concepts. The knowledge and skills acquired in the subject has much greater affect in understanding science than any other branch.

Sciences – Chemistry (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Chemistry

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Theory

  • Atoms and Molecules
  • Atomic Structure
  • Periodic Table
  • Chemical Bonding
  • The Gaseous State
  • Colloidal Solutions
  • Chemical Kinetics
  • Chemical Energetics
  • Study of Representative Elements: Group 1, 2, 13, 14, 15
  • Preparation, properties and uses of Compounds of Groups 1, 2, 13, 14, 15.
  • Redox Reactions
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry
  • Types of Chemical Reactions and their Mechanisms
  • Aliphatic and Aromatic Hydrocarbons
  • Alkyl and Aryl Halides
  • Applications of Chemicals
  • Energy

Practical Work

  • Basic laboratory techniques
  • Qualitative analysis; identification of a given salt
  • Titration: acid-base titration involving molarity and normality

SC Form

Theory

  • Relative Molecular Mass and Mole
  • States of Matters: Structure and Properties-Solid State
  • Chemical Kinetics
  • Chemical Equilibria
  • Ionic Equilibria
  • Electrochemistry
  • Coordination Compounds
  • Chemistry of p-Block Elements: Group 16, 17, 18
  • Preparation/ Manufacture, Properties and Uses of Compounds of Groups 16, 17, – Ozone, Sulphur Dioxide, Sulphuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid
  • Chemistry of Transition and Inner- Transition Elements: d-Block: 3d, 4d and 5d series; f-Block: 4f and 5f series
  • Alcohols and Phenols
  • Alcohols and Phenols
  • Carboxylic acids and Acid Derivatives
  • Cyanide, Isocyanide, Nitro compounds and Amines
  • Polymers
  • Isomerism
  • Biomolecules

Practical Work

  • Qualitative analysis
  • Study of the rate of reaction
  • Titrations
  • Identification of compounds and functional groups based on observations
  • Electrochemistry
  • Ionic Equilibria

Learning Objectives

  • To foster acquisition of knowledge and understanding of terms, concepts, facts, processes, techniques and principles relating to the subject of Chemistry.
  • To develop the ability to apply the knowledge of contents and principles of Chemistry in new or unfamiliar situations.
  • To develop skills in proper handling of apparatus and chemicals.
  • To develop an ability to appreciate achievements in the field of Chemistry and its role in nature and society.
  • To develop an interest in activities involving usage of the knowledge of Chemistry.
  • To develop a scientific attitude through the study of Physical Sciences.
  • To acquaint students with the emerging frontiers and interdisciplinary aspects of the subject.
  • To develop skills relevant to the discipline.
  • To apprise students with interface of Chemistry with other disciplines of Science, such as, Physics, Biology, Geology, Engineering, etc.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall knowledge points
  • Understanding of the fundamental concepts
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations
  • Ability to process data and conclude
  • Association of values to learning points
  • Ability to acquire handle instruments, data collection and analysis, conclusion etc.

General Comments

The study of Chemistry is closely related to Physics, Mathematics and Geology. The subject involves skills development in processing data and its interpretation helps in the understanding of the nature of matter. The subject has evolved in many parts of the world and its impact on society and subsequent changes have been immense. A student of Chemistry will certainly find the learning objectives of other science subjects similar to the subject.

Sciences – Physics (ISC)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Physics

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Theory

  • Electrostatics
  • Current Electricity
  • Magnetism
  • Electromagnetism
  • Alternating Current Circuits
  • Wave Optics
  • Ray Optics and Optical Instruments
  • Electrons and Photons
  • Atoms
  • Nuclei
  • Nuclear Energy
  • Semiconductor Devices

Practical Work

  • Experiments based on ray optics
  • Experiments based on current electricity
  • To find f of a convex lens by using u-v method
  • To find f of a convex lens by displacement method
  • Coaxial combination of two convex lenses not in contact
  • Using a convex lens, optical bench and two pins,obtain the positions of the images for various positions of the object
  • Determine the focal length of a concave lens, using an auxiliary convex lens, not in contact and plotting appropriate graph
  • Refractive index of material of lens by Boys’ method
  • Refractive index of a liquid by using convex lens and plane mirror
  • Draw the following set of graphs using data from lens experiments –
    • v against u. It will be a curve
    • Magnification [m=v/u] against v and to find focal length by intercept
    • y = 100/v against x = 100/u and to find f by intercepts

SC Form

Theory

  • Role of Physics
  • Units
  • Dimensions
  • Vectors, Scalar Quantities and Elementary Calculus
  • Dynamics
  • Friction
  • Motion in Fluids
  • Circular Motion
  • Gravitation
  • Properties of Matter – Temperature
  • Internal Energy
  • Oscillations
  • Waves

Practical Work

  • Measurement by Vernier callipers
  • Find the diameter of a wire using a micrometer screw gauge
  • Determine radius of curvature of a spherical surface like watch glass by a spherometer
  • Equilibrium of three concurrent coplanar forces.
  • Inclined plane
  • Friction: To find the force of kinetic friction for a wooden block placed on horizontal surface and to study its relationship with normal reaction. To determine the coefficient of friction.
  • To find the acceleration due to gravity
  • To find the force constant of a spring and to study variation in time period of oscillation of a body suspended by the spring
  • Oscillation of a simple meter rule used as bar pendulum.
  • Boyle’s Law: To study the variation in volume with pressure for a sample of air at constant temperature
  • Cooling curve: To study the fall in temperature of a body (like hot water or liquid in calorimeter) with time
  • Determine Young’s modulus of elasticity using Searle’s apparatus
  • To study the variation in frequency of air column with length using resonance column apparatus or a long cylinder and set of tuning forks
  • To determine frequency of a tuning fork using a sonometer
  • To verify laws of vibration of strings using a sonometer
  • To determine the surface tension of water by capillary rise method

Learning Objectives

  • To enable candidates to acquire knowledge and develop an understanding of the terms, facts, concepts, definitions, fundamental laws, principles and processes in the field of Physics
  • To develop the ability to apply the knowledge and understanding of physics to unfamiliar situations
  • To develop a scientific attitude through the study of physical sciences
  • To develop skills in:
  • The practical aspects of handling apparatus, recording observations and
  • Drawing diagrams, graph etc.
  • To develop an appreciation of the contribution of physics towards scientific and technological developments and towards human happiness
  • To develop an interest in the world of physical sciences

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall knowledge points.
  • Understanding of the fundamental concepts.
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations.
  • Ability to process data and conclude.
  • Association of values to learning points.
  • Ability to acquire handle instruments, data collection and analysis, conclusion etc.

General Comments

The study of Physics is closely related to Mathematics. Skills developed in processing of data and its interpretation helps in the understanding of many concepts. The development of this subject in different parts of the world, its impact on society and subsequent changes in the established order has close relations with many learning objectives in Chemistry, Computer Science and even subjects like History, Geography and Political Science. Therefore a holistic study of these subjects with an open mind can help a student of Physics become a true enquirer.

Sciences – Biology (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Biology

Curriculum: IB (S and SC Forms)

Course Content

The syllabus for the Diploma Programme biology course is divided into three parts: the core, the AHL material and the options. A syllabus overview is provided below.

Teaching hours: Core 80

  • Topic 1: Statistical analysis 2
  • Topic 2: Cells 12
  • Topic 3: The chemistry of life 15
  • Topic 4: Genetics 15
  • Topic 5: Ecology and evolution 16
  • Topic 6: Human health and physiology 20

Teaching hours: AHL 55

  • Topic 7: Nucleic acids and proteins 11
  • Topic 8: Cell respiration and photosynthesis 10
  • Topic 9: Plant science 11
  • Topic 10: Genetics 6
  • Topic 11: Human health and physiology 17

Teaching hours: Options 15/22
Options SL

  • Option A: Human nutrition and health 15
  • Option B: Physiology of exercise 15
  • Option C: Cells and energy 15

Options SL and HL

  • Option D: Evolution 15/22
  • Option E: Neurobiology and behaviour 15/22
  • Option F: Microbes and biotechnology 15/22
  • Option G: Ecology and conservation 15/22

Options HL

Option H: Further human physiology 22

Students at SL are required to study any two options from A–G. The duration of each option is 15 hours.

Students at HL are required to study any two options from D–H. The duration of each option is 22 hours.

Learning Objectives

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

It is in this context that all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses should aim to:

  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Understanding of:

    a) scientific facts and concepts

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific terminology

    d) methods of presenting scientific information.

  • Apply and use:

    e) scientific facts and concepts

    f) scientific methods and techniques

    g) scientific terminology to communicate effectively

    h) appropriate methods to present scientific information.

  • Construct, analyse and evaluate:

    a) hypotheses, research questions and predictions

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific explanations.

  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

General Comments

Biologists have accumulated huge amounts of information about living organisms, and it would be easy to confuse students by teaching large numbers of seemingly unrelated facts. In the Diploma Programme biology course, it is hoped that students will acquire a limited body of facts and, at the same time, develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of the subject.

Although the Diploma Programme biology course at standard level (SL) and higher level (HL) has been written as a series of discrete statements (for assessment purposes), there are four basic biological concepts that run throughout.

Sciences – Chemistry (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Chemistry

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

The syllabus for the Diploma Programme chemistry course is divided into three parts: the core, the AHL material and the options. The Chemistry data booklet is an integral part of the syllabus and should be used in conjunction with the syllabus. Students should use the data booklet during the course, and they should be issued with clean copies of it for the paper 2 and paper 3 examinations.

Teaching hours: Core 80

  • Topic 1: Quantitative chemistry 12.5
  • Topic 2: Atomic structure 4
  • Topic 3: Periodicity 6
  • Topic 4: Bonding 12.5
  • Topic 5: Energetics 8
  • Topic 6: Kinetics 5
  • Topic 7: Equilibrium 5
  • Topic 8: Acids and bases 6
  • Topic 9: Oxidation and reduction 7
  • Topic 10: Organic chemistry 12
  • Topic 11: Measurement and data processing 2

Teaching hours: AHL 55

  • Topic 12: Atomic structure 3
  • Topic 13: Periodicity 4
  • Topic 14: Bonding 5
  • Topic 15: Energetics 8
  • Topic 16: Kinetics 6
  • Topic 17: Equilibrium 4
  • Topic 18: Acids and bases 10
  • Topic 19: Oxidation and reduction 5
  • Topic 20: Organic chemistry 10

Teaching hours: Options 15/22
Options SL and HL

  • Option A: Modern analytical chemistry 15/22
  • Option B: Human biochemistry 15/22
  • Option C: Chemistry in industry and technology 15/22
  • Option D: Medicines and drugs 15/22
  • Option E: Environmental chemistry 15/22
  • Option F: Food chemistry 15/22
  • Option G: Further organic chemistry 15/22

Students at SL are required to study any two options from A to G. The duration of each option is 15 hours.

Students at HL are required to study any two options from A to G. The duration of each option is 22 hours.

Learning Objectives

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

It is in this context that all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses should aim to:

  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Demonstrate an understanding of:

    a) scientific facts and concepts

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific terminology

    d) methods of presenting scientific information.

  • Apply and use:

    a) scientific facts and concepts

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific terminology to communicate effectively

    d) appropriate methods to present scientific information.

  • Construct, analyse and evaluate:

    a) hypotheses, research questions and predictions

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific explanations.

  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

General Comments

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful preparation for employment.

The Diploma Programme chemistry course includes the essential principles of the subject but also, through selection of options, allows teachers some flexibility to tailor the course to meet the needs of their students.

The course is available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study science in higher education and those who do not.

Sciences – Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) (IB)

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: ESS

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

Systems and Models

The Ecosystem

Human Populations, Carrying Capacity and Resource Use

Conservation and Bio-diversity

Pollution Management

The Issue of Global Warming

Environmental Value Systems

Learning Objectives

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

It is in this context that all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses should aim to:

  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Demonstrate an understanding of:

    a) scientific facts and concepts

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific terminology

    d) methods of presenting scientific information.

  • Apply and use:

    a) scientific facts and concepts

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific terminology to communicate effectively

    d) appropriate methods to present scientific information.

  • Construct, analyze and evaluate:

    a) hypotheses, research questions and predictions

    b) scientific methods and techniques

    c) scientific explanations.

  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

General Comments

Through studying environmental systems and societies (ESS) students will be provided with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies – one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. The teaching approach is such that students are allowed to evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of issues.

Sciences – Physics

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Physics

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

The syllabus for the Diploma Programme physics course is divided into three parts: the core, the AHL material and the options. The Physics data booklet is an integral part of the syllabus and should be used in conjunction with the syllabus. Students should use the data booklet during the course, and they should be issued with clean copies for papers 1, 2 and 3 in the examination.

Topics Teaching hours
Core 80
Topic 1: Physics and physical measurement 5
Topic 2: Mechanics 17
Topic 3: Thermal physics 7
Topic 4: Oscillations and waves 10
Topic 5: Electric currents 7
Topic 6: Fields and forces 7
Topic 7: Atomic and nuclear physics 9
Topic 8: Energy, power and climate change 18
AHL 55
Topic 9: Motion in fields 8
Topic 10: Thermal physics 6
Topic 11: Wave phenomena 12
Topic 12: Electromagnetic induction 6
Topic 13: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 15
Topic 14: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 8
Options 15/22
Options SL 15
Option A: Sight and wave phenomena 15
Option B: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 15
Option C: Digital technology 15
Option D: Relativity and particle physics 15
Options SL and HL  
Option E: Astrophysics 15/22
Option F: Communications 15/22
Option G: Electromagnetic waves 15/22
Options HL  
Option H: Relativity 22
Option I: Medical physics 22
Option J: Particle physics 22

Students at SL are required to study any two options from A to G. The duration of each option is 15 hours.

Students at HL are required to study any two options from E to J. The duration of each option is 22 hours.

Learning Objectives

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

It is in this context that all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses should aim to:

  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global
  • context that will stimulate and challenge students

  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Demonstrate an understanding of:

    a. scientific facts and concepts

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific terminology

    d. methods of presenting scientific information.

  • Apply and use:

    a. scientific facts and concepts

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific terminology to communicate effectively

    d. appropriate methods to present scientific information.

  • Construct, analyse and evaluate:

    a. hypotheses, research questions and predictions

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific explanations.

  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

General Comments

Physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

Physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

This raises the issue of the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. These concerns have become more prominent as our power over the environment has grown, particularly among young people, for whom the importance of the responsibility of physicists for their own actions is self-evident.

Physics is therefore, above all, a human activity, and students need to be aware of the context in which physicists work. Illuminating its historical development places the knowledge and the process of physics in a context of dynamic change, in contrast to the static context in which physics has sometimes been presented. This can give students insights into the human side of physics: the individuals; their personalities, times and social milieux; and their challenges, disappointments and triumphs.