Physics

Physics – D and C

Academic Department Details

Department:Department of science

Subject:Physics

Course Content

D Form

  • About Physics: Scientists, Scope of the Subject
  • Energy Resources
  • Measurements
  • Electrostatics and Electricity
  • Heat
  • Light
  • Sound

C Form

  • Measurements
  • Magnetism
  • Electrostatics
  • Current Electricity
  • Light
  • Heat
  • Sound

Learning Objectives

  • Acquiring scientific knowledge and knowing scientific methods
  • Application of knowledge and methods
  • Acquiring skills in handling instruments

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Understanding and analyzing scientific data and methods
  • Hands-on experience with instruments
  • Critical thinking and problem-solving
  • Use knowledge, apply techniques and analyze information

General Comments

The study of Physics at The Doon School has always been very exciting for the students in D and C Forms as the course involves hands-on-lab work for students. The teachers believe that ‘learning by doing’ develops skills and knowledge required for the growth of scientific temperament. The content in D and C Forms is appropriately punctuated by activities to enhance problem solving and scientific communication while at the same time addresses the greater challenge to prepare responsible citizens of the world.

In the past few years the course work has been revised to provide exposure to Indian scientists and their work in several fields of study. This has been specially done to promote national identity and pride among young students for our great scientists.

Any coursework is incomplete if the question paper based on the curriculum doesn’t challenge a student. The question papers in the subject are designed to test knowledge, application, analysis and understanding at the right level. This way students are not only tested on memory but their basic understanding of the concepts.

Sciences – Physics – B and A

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Physics

Curriculum: ICSE

Course Content

B Form

Theory

  • Measurements and Experimentation
  • Motion in one dimension
  • Laws of Motion
  • Fluids
  • Heat
  • Light
  • Sound
  • Electricity and Magnetism

Practical Work

  • Candidates will be asked to carry out experiments for which instructions are given. The experiments may be based on topics that are not included in the syllabus but theoretical knowledge will not be required. A candidate will be expected to be able to follow simple instructions, to take suitable readings and to present these readings in a systematic form. He/she may be required to exhibit his/her data graphically. Candidates will be expected to appreciate and use the concepts of least count, significant figures and elementary error handling
  • A set of 6 to 10 experiments may be designed as given at Council Website or as found most suitable by the teacher. Students should be encouraged to record their observations systematically in a neat tabular form – in columns with column heads including units or in numbered rows as necessary. The final result or conclusion may be recorded for each experiment. Some of the experiments may be demonstrated (with the help of students) if these cannot be given to each student as lab experiments.

A Form

Theory

  • Force, Work, Energy and Power
  • Light
  • Sound
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Modern Physics
  • Heat

Practical Work

  • Candidates will be asked to carry out experiments for which instructions will be given. The experiments may be based on topics that are not included in the syllabus but theoretical knowledge will not be required. A candidate will be expected to be able to follow simple instructions, to take suitable readings and to present these readings in a systematic form. He/she may be required to exhibit his/her data graphically. Candidates will be expected to appreciate and use the concepts of least count, significant figures and elementary error handling.
  • Teachers may design their own set of experiments, preferably related to the theory syllabus. A comprehensive list is suggested at the Council Website.

Learning Objectives

  • To acquire knowledge and understanding of the terms, facts, concepts, definitions, laws, principles and processes of Physics
  • To develop skills in practical aspects of handling apparatus, recording observations and in drawing diagrams, graphs, etc.
  • To develop instrumental, communication, deductive and problem-solving skills
  • To discover that there is a living and growing physics relevant to the modern age in which we live

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall knowledge points
  • Understanding of the fundamental concepts
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations
  • Ability to process data and conclude
  • Association of values to learning points

General Comments

The study of Physics is closely related to Mathematics. Skills developed in processing of data and its interpretation helps in the understanding of many concepts. The development of this subject in different parts of the world, its impact on society and subsequent changes in the established order has close relations with many learning objectives in Chemistry, Computer Science and even subjects like History, Geography and Political Science. Therefore a holistic study of these subjects with an open mind can help a student of Physics become a true enquirer.

Sciences – Physics (ISC) – S and SC

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Physics

Curriculum: ISC

Course Content

S Form

Theory

  • Electrostatics
  • Current Electricity
  • Magnetism
  • Electromagnetism
  • Alternating Current Circuits
  • Wave Optics
  • Ray Optics and Optical Instruments
  • Electrons and Photons
  • Atoms
  • Nuclei
  • Nuclear Energy
  • Semiconductor Devices

Practical Work

  • Experiments based on ray optics
  • Experiments based on current electricity
  • To find f of a convex lens by using u-v method
  • To find f of a convex lens by displacement method
  • Coaxial combination of two convex lenses not in contact
  • Using a convex lens, optical bench and two pins,obtain the positions of the images for various positions of the object
  • Determine the focal length of a concave lens, using an auxiliary convex lens, not in contact and plotting appropriate graph
  • Refractive index of material of lens by Boys’ method
  • Refractive index of a liquid by using convex lens and plane mirror
  • Draw the following set of graphs using data from lens experiments –
    • v against u. It will be a curve
    • Magnification [m=v/u] against v and to find focal length by intercept
    • y = 100/v against x = 100/u and to find f by intercepts

SC Form

Theory

  • Role of Physics
  • Units
  • Dimensions
  • Vectors, Scalar Quantities and Elementary Calculus
  • Dynamics
  • Friction
  • Motion in Fluids
  • Circular Motion
  • Gravitation
  • Properties of Matter – Temperature
  • Internal Energy
  • Oscillations
  • Waves

Practical Work

  • Measurement by Vernier callipers
  • Find the diameter of a wire using a micrometer screw gauge
  • Determine radius of curvature of a spherical surface like watch glass by a spherometer
  • Equilibrium of three concurrent coplanar forces.
  • Inclined plane
  • Friction: To find the force of kinetic friction for a wooden block placed on horizontal surface and to study its relationship with normal reaction. To determine the coefficient of friction.
  • To find the acceleration due to gravity
  • To find the force constant of a spring and to study variation in time period of oscillation of a body suspended by the spring
  • Oscillation of a simple meter rule used as bar pendulum.
  • Boyle’s Law: To study the variation in volume with pressure for a sample of air at constant temperature
  • Cooling curve: To study the fall in temperature of a body (like hot water or liquid in calorimeter) with time
  • Determine Young’s modulus of elasticity using Searle’s apparatus
  • To study the variation in frequency of air column with length using resonance column apparatus or a long cylinder and set of tuning forks
  • To determine frequency of a tuning fork using a sonometer
  • To verify laws of vibration of strings using a sonometer
  • To determine the surface tension of water by capillary rise method

Learning Objectives

  • To enable candidates to acquire knowledge and develop an understanding of the terms, facts, concepts, definitions, fundamental laws, principles and processes in the field of Physics
  • To develop the ability to apply the knowledge and understanding of physics to unfamiliar situations
  • To develop a scientific attitude through the study of physical sciences
  • To develop skills in:
  • The practical aspects of handling apparatus, recording observations and
  • Drawing diagrams, graph etc.
  • To develop an appreciation of the contribution of physics towards scientific and technological developments and towards human happiness
  • To develop an interest in the world of physical sciences

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Ability to recall knowledge points.
  • Understanding of the fundamental concepts.
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations.
  • Ability to process data and conclude.
  • Association of values to learning points.
  • Ability to acquire handle instruments, data collection and analysis, conclusion etc.

General Comments

The study of Physics is closely related to Mathematics. Skills developed in processing of data and its interpretation helps in the understanding of many concepts. The development of this subject in different parts of the world, its impact on society and subsequent changes in the established order has close relations with many learning objectives in Chemistry, Computer Science and even subjects like History, Geography and Political Science. Therefore a holistic study of these subjects with an open mind can help a student of Physics become a true enquirer.

Sciences – Physics – S and SC

Academic Department Details

Department: Department of Science

Subject: Physics

Curriculum: IB

Course Content

The syllabus for the Diploma Programme physics course is divided into three parts: the core, the AHL material and the options. The Physics data booklet is an integral part of the syllabus and should be used in conjunction with the syllabus. Students should use the data booklet during the course, and they should be issued with clean copies for papers 1, 2 and 3 in the examination.

Topics Teaching hours
Core 80
Topic 1: Physics and physical measurement 5
Topic 2: Mechanics 17
Topic 3: Thermal physics 7
Topic 4: Oscillations and waves 10
Topic 5: Electric currents 7
Topic 6: Fields and forces 7
Topic 7: Atomic and nuclear physics 9
Topic 8: Energy, power and climate change 18
AHL 55
Topic 9: Motion in fields 8
Topic 10: Thermal physics 6
Topic 11: Wave phenomena 12
Topic 12: Electromagnetic induction 6
Topic 13: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 15
Topic 14: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 8
Options 15/22
Options SL 15
Option A: Sight and wave phenomena 15
Option B: Quantum physics and nuclear physics 15
Option C: Digital technology 15
Option D: Relativity and particle physics 15
Options SL and HL  
Option E: Astrophysics 15/22
Option F: Communications 15/22
Option G: Electromagnetic waves 15/22
Options HL  
Option H: Relativity 22
Option I: Medical physics 22
Option J: Particle physics 22

Students at SL are required to study any two options from A to G. The duration of each option is 15 hours.

Students at HL are required to study any two options from E to J. The duration of each option is 22 hours.

Learning Objectives

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

It is in this context that all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses should aim to:

  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global
  • context that will stimulate and challenge students

  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

Skills Acquired by Students

  • Demonstrate an understanding of:

    a. scientific facts and concepts

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific terminology

    d. methods of presenting scientific information.

  • Apply and use:

    a. scientific facts and concepts

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific terminology to communicate effectively

    d. appropriate methods to present scientific information.

  • Construct, analyse and evaluate:

    a. hypotheses, research questions and predictions

    b. scientific methods and techniques

    c. scientific explanations.

  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

General Comments

Physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

Physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right.

This raises the issue of the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. These concerns have become more prominent as our power over the environment has grown, particularly among young people, for whom the importance of the responsibility of physicists for their own actions is self-evident.

Physics is therefore, above all, a human activity, and students need to be aware of the context in which physicists work. Illuminating its historical development places the knowledge and the process of physics in a context of dynamic change, in contrast to the static context in which physics has sometimes been presented. This can give students insights into the human side of physics: the individuals; their personalities, times and social milieux; and their challenges, disappointments and triumphs.